Records of The Glasgow School of Art, Glasgow, Scotland, 15th century-2014 Add to your favourites. View associated digital content.

Collection Overview

Title: Records of The Glasgow School of Art, Glasgow, Scotland, 15th century-2014 Add to your favourites. View associated digital content.

Primary Creator: The Glasgow School of Art (1845-)

Extent: 435.6 Linear Feet

Arrangement: This material has been arranged into series, which consist of records related by format and/or function.

Subjects: Administration, Archives, Art education, Curriculum development, Glasgow, Scotland, Higher education, Photographs, Printed ephemera, The Glasgow School of Art

Languages: English

Scope and Contents of the Materials

Includes:

Records of the Academic Council, 1973-2000

Audiovisual material, c1950s-2000s

Records of the Board of Studies, 1932-1950

Records of the Continuing Education Department, c1988-2000

Records of the Assistant Director and Company Secretary, c1986-2008

Records of the Deputy Director, c1946-1993

Records of the School of Design, c1979-2001

Records of the Development and External Relations Office, c1997-2004

Records of the Director, 1846-

Records of GSA Enterprises, c1991-2000

Ephemera collection, 1890-

The School's collection of ephemera includes flyers, programmes and tickets for events at the School, such as plays, fashion shows, charities week events, exhibitions and performances.

Records of the Estates Department, c1964-2007

Records of the Exhibitions Officer, c1990-1994

Records of the School of Fine Art, c1978-1999

Records of the Finance Officer, 1870-2000

Records of First Year Studies, c1988-2000

Records of the Board of Governors, 1847-2007

Key records include:

Annual reports, 1847-2000 - The School's annual reports provide information on governors, staff and prizewinning students, and sometimes but not always, a headmaster's or director's report and annual accounts.

Building Committee papers, 1883-1949 - Minutes, correspondence, estimates, specifications and financial records relating to the erection of the Mackintosh Building, as well as the School's extension scheme.

Records of House for an Art Lover

Records of Liberal Studies/Historical and Critical Studies, c1992

Records of Information Services, c1900-2004

Records of the Mackintosh School of Architecture, c1957-2002

Newspaper cuttings, 1864-

The School's press cuttings include articles relating to staff and students.

Photographs, c1880s-

The School's photograph collection provides an excellent record of events at The Glasgow School of Art, its students and their work.

Records of the Personnel Office, c1987-2006

Records of the Planning Department, 1962-1964

Records of the Registrar, c1881-2000

Key records include:

Student records, 1881-1997 - The School's student registers can provide student's names, dates of birth, dates of admission, educational background, addresses, occupations, courses taken and marks and awards gained.

Prospectuses, 1893-1995 - The School's prospectuses provide information about staff and governors; the organisation and administration of the School; summaries of the School's curriculum; individual courses and tutors; fees; scholarships and bursaries.

Records of the School Council, 1969-1982

Records of the Secretary and Treasurer, 1853-1996

Records of the Senior Management Group

Records of the School of Simulation and Visualisation

Records of the Staff Council, 1909-1949

Records of the Student Support Service

Biographical Note

The Glasgow School of Art has its origins in the Glasgow Government School of Design, which was established on 6 January 1845. The Glasgow Government School of Design was one of twenty similar institutions established in the United Kingdom's manufacturing centres between 1837 and 1851. Set up as a consequence of the evidence given to the House of Commons Select Committee on Arts and their connection with Manufactures of 1835-1836, the Government Schools hoped to improve the quality of the country's product design through a system of education that provided training in design for industry. Somerset House was the first of such schools to be established, opening in 1837, and others followed throughout the provinces.

In 1853 the Glasgow Government School of Design changed its name to the Glasgow School of Art. Following the receipt of some funding from the Haldane Academy Trust, (a trust set up by James Haldane, a Glasgow engraver, in 1833), The Glasgow School of Art was required to incorporate the name of the trust into its title. Consequently, it became the Glasgow School of Art and Haldane Academy, although by 1891 the "Haldane Academy" was dropped from the title. Glasgow School of Art was incorporated in 1892. In 1901 the Glasgow School of Art was designated a Central Institution for Higher Art Education in Glasgow and the West of Scotland.

Initially the School was located at 12 Ingram Street, Glasgow, but in 1869, it moved to the Corporation Buildings on Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow. In 1897 work started on a new building to house the School of Art on Renfrew Street, Glasgow. The building was designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh, former pupil of The Glasgow School of Art. The first half of the building was completed in 1899 and the second in 1909.

The Government Schools ran courses in elementary drawing, shading from the flat, shading from casts, chiaroscuro painting, colouring, figure drawing from the flat, figure drawing from the round, painting the figure, geometrical drawing, perspective, modelling and design. All these courses were introduced from the start at the Glasgow School apart from that of design. The course in design was the "summit of the system" where students came up with original designs for actual manufactures or decorative purposes and it was not until 1849, when Charles Heath Wilson became headmaster, that classes in design began to be taught. Also in this year Bruce Bell was engaged to teach mechanical and architectural drawing.

After 1853 the above pattern of courses was extended to 26 stages which formed the national curriculum for art schools. This system was known as the South Kensington system. An Art Masters could be awarded by gaining certificates in the available subjects. There was no restriction on entry and students could take as long as they wished to accumulate their passes before being awarded their Art Masters.

In 1901 the Glasgow School of Art was given the power to award its own diplomas. In the same year Art 91D classes for day school teachers commenced which were later known as the Art 55 classes. From 1901 to 1979 the School of Art awarded its own diplomas and thereafter it awarded degrees of the Council for National Academic Awards. In the 1970s the School of Fine Art and the School of Design were established. With the demise of the Council for National Academic Awards, from 1993 Glasgow University awarded the School's degrees in fine art and design.

In 1885 the Glasgow School of Art taught architecture and building construction conforming to the South Kensington system. Following on from the designation of the School as a Central Institution and the empowerment of the School to award its own diplomas, the School and the Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College worked together to produce a curriculum for a new course leading to a joint diploma. In 1903 the joint Glasgow School of Architecture was established within the Glasgow School of Art in conjunction with the Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College. For the new diploma design classes were to be taught at the School of Art and the construction classes at the Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College. The first diplomas in architecture were awarded in 1910. In 1924 the Glasgow School of Art became a university teaching institution when the University of Glasgow set up a BSc in Architecture which was to be taught at the School of Architecture. In 1964 the Royal College of Science and Technology (formerly the Royal Technical College, formerly the Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College) merged with the Scottish College of Commerce to form the new University of Strathclyde. Following the merger the Glasgow School of Architecture came to an end, the last students transferring to Strathclyde degrees and graduating in 1968. In 1970 the Mackintosh School of Architecture was established. It is housed within the Glasgow School of Art and forms that school's Department of Architecture. Its degrees are accredited by the University of Glasgow and its Head is the University's Professor of Architecture.

The Glasgow Government School of Design was originally managed, as were the other Government Schools, by the Board of Trade and a Committee of Management representing local subscribers. Then, in 1852, the Government Schools of Design were taken over by the Department of Practical Art. This Department was renamed the Department of Science and Art in 1853 and was located in South Kensington, London. The Committee of Management was replaced in 1892 by the Board of Governors. In 1898, control of the School was transferred again, this time to the Scotch Education Department (renamed the Scottish Education Department in 1918). The School became academically independent in 1901 when it was free to develop its own curriculum and its own diplomas, subject to the approval of the Scottish Education Department. The chief executive of the School was the Headmaster, renamed Director in 1901, and a Secretary and Treasurer was responsible for all aspects of the administration of the School. As the School grew, other administrative posts were added.

Subject/Index Terms

Administration
Archives
Art education
Curriculum development
Glasgow, Scotland
Higher education
Photographs
Printed ephemera
The Glasgow School of Art

Administrative Information

Repository: GSA Archives

Access Restrictions:

Glasgow School of Art Archives and Collections are open for research by appointment.

Most records which are over 30 years old are available for public consultation. There is restricted access to records which are less than 30 years old, however these can be accessed with the permission of the Head of the relevant department of the School. Student records are closed until they are 75 years old in order to maintain personal confidentiality.

Some material is currently uncatalogued and therefore not accessible for researchers.

Use Restrictions:

Application for permission to quote should be submitted to The Archives and Collections Centre at The Glasgow School of Art.

Reproduction subject to usual conditions: educational use and condition of documents.

Appraisal Information: This material has been appraised in line with Glasgow School of Art Archives and Collections standard procedures.

Processing Information:

Fonds level finding aid created by Emily Woolmore, GASHE Project Archivist, 21 March 2000 and amended by Victoria Peters, GASHE Project Manager, 29 August 2001 and 3 January 2002 as part of the Research Support Libraries Programme funded project "Gateway to Archives of Scottish Higher Education".

Ammended for submission to the JISC Archives Hub by David Powell, Hub Project Archivist, January 2002.

08 June 2005 Catalogue record converted to EAD2002, May 2005.

Fonds level description imported from the Archives Hub, 11 September 2006.

Finding Aid Revision History:

Catalogue imported into Archon software and edited by Michelle Kaye, Archon Project Officer, October 2014.

Description edited by Michelle Kaye, Collections Development Officer, September 2017.


Description of Contents

Records of the Academic Council, 1973-2001,
Audiovisual material, c1950s-2000s,
Records of the Board of Studies, 1932-1950,
Records of the Continuing Education Department, 1965-2006,
Records of the Assistant Director and Company Secretary, c1986-2008,
Records of the Deputy Director, c1946-1993,
Records of the Design School, c1979-2001,
Records of the Development and External Relations Office, c1997-2004,
Records of the Director of the Glasgow School of Art, 1846-,
Records of GSA Enterprises, c1991-2000,
Ephemera collection, 15th century-,
Records of the Estates Department, c1964-2007,
Records of the Exhibitions Department, c1989-2016,
Records of the School of Fine Art, c1978-1999,
Records of the Finance Officer, 1870-2000,
Records of the First Year Studies Department, c1988-2000,
Records of the Board of Governors, 1844-2017,
Records of House for an Art Lover,
Records of the Liberal Studies/Historical and Critical Studies Department, c1992,
Records of Information Services, c1900-2004,
Records of the School of Architecture, c1957-2002,
Newspaper cuttings, 1864-,
Photographs, c1880s-,
Records of the Personnel Office, c1987-2006,
Records of the Planning Department, 1962-1964,
,
Records of the Registrar, c1881-2000,
Records of the School Council, 1969-1982,
Records of the Secretary and Treasurer, 1853-1996,
Records of the Senior Management Group,
Records of the School of Simulation and Visualisation,
Records of the Staff Council, 1909-1949,

GSAA/P, (Sub-Fonds) Photographs, c1880s- Add to your favourites. 
Description:

Some of this material is currently uncatalogued and therefore not accessible for researchers.

The photographic collections consist of loose photographs, bound albums of photographs and a large collection of lantern slides and glass plate negatives. The photographs record events at The Glasgow School of Art, its students and their work and act as an important historical source. A large part of the collection consists of the plate glass negatives which were used from the 19th century onwards as a teaching aid and consist of photographic plates of international artworks and architectural examples.

Extent: 12 metres plus 1 box of uncatalogued material
Reference: GSAA/P
Biography or History: The Glasgow School of Art photographic collection consists of images taken by GSA to record the activities of the School; images taken for publicity purposes; images donated by former staff and students illustrating their time at the School; and images used as teaching aids at GSA.

Arrangement: The photograph collection is arranged in 7 series:

P/1: Loose photographs

P/2: Photograph albums

P/3: Photographic negatives

P/4: Glass plate negatives and Lantern Slides

P/5: Slides

P/6: Photographs of students from the textiles department

P/7: Photographs of the Mackintosh Building

Creator(s):

The Glasgow School of Art

Subject(s):

Art education - Extracurricular activities - Photographs - Teaching materials - The Glasgow School of Art

GSAA/P/1, (Series) Loose photographs, c1880s- Add to your favourites. View associated digital content. 
Description: This series of photographs holds images directly related to The Glasgow School of Art. These images include photographs of staff and students at work, fashion shows, student activities and Glasgow School of Art official functions.
Extent: 8 boxes, c2500 photographs
Reference: GSAA/P/1
Arrangement: There is no apparent system of arrangement although the photographs are numbered.
GSAA/P/2, (Series) Photograph albums, 1949-1962 Add to your favourites. 
Description: These albums were commissioned by Harry Barnes during his time as Deputy Director of the Glasgow School of Art (1946-1964). The reason for their commission is unknown yet it is known that Barnes was keen on documenting the history of the School of Art and that creating albums such as these was a way of capturing aspects of the School's life.
Extent: 9 albums
Reference: GSAA/P/2
Arrangement: These albums consist chiefly of photographs of student work from individual academic departments and student events.
GSAA/P/3, (Series) Photographic negatives, 1969-1999 Add to your favourites. 
Description:

This series of negatives contains images chiefly of student work, exhibitions and Glasgow School of Art events from 1969 to 1999.

Please note, the following negatives are missing:

16, 22, 26, 30, 31, 40, 41, 47, 53-54, 60-63, 84, 86, 88-89, 93, 97-98, 102-104, 108, 114, 117, 125, 134-135, 141-142, 161-162, 164, 169-170, 187, 188, 242-243, 249

Extent: 815 files, 16 folders, 3 linear metres
Reference: GSAA/P/3

Biography or History: The negatives were produced by the Photographic section of the Graphics department to record the work and events of the Glasgow School of Art, but were only processed into actual photographs upon request.

The Photographic section was founded in the early 1970s and was closed down in 2003. The first members of staff were Ralph Burnett and Ian MacKenzie. While MacKenzie left the Photographic section in 1978, Burnett continued until 1984. Mike Graham replaced MacKenzie in 1978. Andy Stark was also a staff member.

The Photographic section served the entire School up to the early 1980s and only the School of Design thereafter. The section covered all photographic duties from documenting main events such as diploma/degree shows to producing images of student work for prospectuses and creating copy negatives for lectures and projects. The section served both staff and students.

The staff at the Photographic section had their own black and white darkroom and cameras (Nikon F for 35mm, Hasselblad for medium format and MPP and Sinar for large format). Colour films were processed at Hamilton & Tate. The section was also able to do cibachrome for a while and they were the first to start working with video in the entire Glasgow School of Art.

Arrangement: The negatives are arranged chronologically. They retain the numbering system used by the Photographic section which reflects the job number of each set of negatives. Each job is filed individually.
GSAA/P/4, (Series) Lantern slides and glass plate negatives, early 20th century Add to your favourites. View associated digital content. 
Description:

This series contains lantern slides showing images used at The Glasgow School of Art for a wide range of teaching purposes, including European and Asian art history, costumes, ethnography, anatomy, animals, lettering and illumination, typography and architecture. The lantern slides are in the format of an English lantern slide (82 x 82 mm and 85 x 100 mm).

The series also contains glass plate negatives showing images of Glasgow School of Art student work, predominantly architecture and sculpture. However there are also negatives showing stage costumes, leatherwork, textiles design, ceramics and silversmithing. This series also contains a small amount of private photographs of staff and students as well as images of GSA's Mackintosh Building. The negatives are in various formats, most of them are an English Non Standard (Half Plate 122 x 167 mm) and a Daguerreotype Traditional (Quarter Plate, 84 x110 mm).

A considerable amount of the glass plate negatives contain images for teaching purposes, mainly reproductions from GSA library books ("Fragments Antiques", "A History of Greek Art", "A History of Art in Ancient Egypt"). Their size is an Daguerreotype Traditional (Quarter Plate, 84 x110 mm).

The organisation and numbering of the material reflects a previous cataloguing scheme:

P4/1-2896: Lantern Slides

P4/10/01-10/43 and P4/11/74-79: Glass Plate Negatives of students work, staff, students and Mackintosh Building

P4/11/1/254 -589 and 11/01/01-63: Glass Plate Negatives used for teaching purposes

Extent: c2500 plate glass negatives, 9 linear metres
Reference: GSAA/P/4
Arrangement: The material is arranged and numbered to reflect a previous cataloguing scheme.
GSAA/P/5, (Series) Slides, c1970s- Add to your favourites. 
Description: Includes: slides of general student work; slides of textile student work; slides of environmental art student work, and general slides.
Extent: 9.5 boxes
Reference: GSAA/P/5
GSAA/P/5/4, (Folder) Degree Show slides taken by individual departments., Late 20th century Add to your favourites. 
GSAA/P/7, (Series) Photographs of the Mackintosh Building, c1900-2007 Add to your favourites. View associated digital content. 
Description: A collection of photographs of the Mackintosh Building, including: aerial photographs and site plans; photographs of the exterior of the building; photographs of the interior of the building including the entrance, corridors, studios, offices and other rooms; photographs of furniture; photographs of scale drawings of furniture; photographs of metalwork and other details.
Extent: 4 boxes, 498 items
Reference: GSAA/P/7
Arrangement: Photographs have generally been categorised by location according to which area of the building is depicted, for example, exterior photographs, photographs of the sub-basement, the basement, the ground floor, the 1st floor, the 2nd floor, followed by metalwork, furniture, details, etc. A group of photographs taken by the Royal Commission for Ancient and Historical Monuments in 2003/4 has been kept as a set in its original order.
GSAA/P/8, (Series) Photograph Albums: Exhibition of British Architecture Paris Students Work Section, May 1914 Add to your favourites. 
Extent: 2 Albums
Former Reference: GSAA/P/7
Reference: GSAA/P/8
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